MERC Conducts Structural Analysis Testing of Transport Isolation Modules

ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI (July 17, 2015)  MERC has worked with the United States Air Force and Production Products in St. Louis, MO to perform a series of structural analyses on the patient air transport isolation modules used in US military aircraft.  The isolation modules are used to transport individuals having dangerous communicable diseases over long distances to appropriate treatment facilities.

The work permitted certification that the transport modules can withstand the operating environments common to military aircraft, particularly the high G-loads that are occasionally encountered.  During a recent Air National Guard exercise at Offutt AFB, Patriot 15, the Transport Isolation Modules were successfully employed on C-17 aircraft.

According to the 55th Wing Public Affairs office, “The Defense Department is in the process of acquiring more of the units and hopes to have 25 available by the end of the year. Each unit can be loaded onto a C-17 or C-130 Hercules for the transfer of multiple critical-care patients anywhere in the world.”

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About Mercer Engineering Research Center

Mercer Engineering Research Center (MERC) is the research and applied engineering arm of Mercer University, a private university founded in 1833. For over 175 years the University has served Georgia as a highly-respected educational institution. In 1984, the School of Engineering was established at the Macon, Georgia campus, with the charter class beginning studies in 1985.

Two years later, in 1987, the Mercer Engineering Research Center was established under the School of Engineering to provide locally available engineering and scientific services and critical specialized technical skills. Today, MERC functions as a non-profit operating unit of the University, with the Executive Director, Dr. David Barwick, reporting directly to the University president, Mr. William D. Underwood.

To learn more, please visit MERC's website at www.merc-mercer.org.